Re-evaluating Environmental Agency in literature, film, and visual arts - Graduate Student Caucus MLA

Seattle, WA, USA (9.-12.1.2020), 16. March 2019.

MLA 2020 (Seattle 9-12 Jan)

Deadline for submissions: March 16, 2019

This panel seeks grad-students’ contributions on the post-anthropocentric cohabitation between human/subjects and non-human/objects in nature as made visible in most media. Send abstracts (250 words) on the renewed relation between nature and human to gradstudentcaucus@gmail.com

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Call for Papers: Edited Collection

Twenty-First Century Gothic on Screen in Australia and New Zealand

Helen Wheatley has argued that Gothic television represents a natural site for the experience of fear, given that it constitutes ‘the most domestic of genres on the most domestic of media’ (‘Haunted Houses, Hidden Rooms’ 25). Indeed, the persistent popularity of the detective narrative, new obsessions with psychological and supernatural disturbances, as well as the resurgence of older narratives of mystery or the Gothic, such as adaptations of Agatha Christie’s works, and of Australian Gothic ‘classics’, such as Picnic at Hanging Rock and Wake in Fright, all constitute a vast proportion of contemporary film and television productions. New ways of watching film and television, via popular streaming services such as Netflix and even YouTube, have also seen a reinvigoration of this ‘most domestic of media’.

But what does this ‘domesticity’ of genre and media look like ‘Down Under’ in the twenty-first century? This collection aims to trace representations of the Gothic on both the small and large screens in Australia and New Zealand over the past two decades. It will attend to the specific development and mutation of the Gothic in these post- or neo-colonial contexts, concentrating in particular on the innovations brought to the genre by this temporal and geographical focus. Papers might address (but are not limited to) film and/or television dealing with:

• Adaptations of Gothic works
• Detective or mystery narratives
• Gothic tropes in otherwise non-Gothic works
• The supernatural
• Feminist/female Gothic
• Configurations of the Gothic in the non-European landscape
• Historical Gothic
• Disruptions of the family and/or childhood
• Documentary or mockumentary productions

Please send an abstract of 250 words and a short bio to Assoc. Prof. Jessica Gildersleeve, University of Southern Queensland (jessica.gildersleeve@usq.edu.au) by 30 April 2019.