Gender and horror

Ed. collection, 19. July 2017.

Following our previous call inviting chapter submissions for a new edited collection focusing on *gender and horror,* we have had such a large number of submissions that we are now aiming to publish three volumes. The first two will focus on films and on television but the third volume will cover other forms of media such as comics and graphic novels, fan literature, video games, and crossover media forms.

 

We would like to extend the call for papers in relation to the third volume *only* and will welcome 200 word abstracts plus a short personal bio.

The deadline for this will be *19 July 2017.*

 
​Responses to this call should be sent to Professor Robert Shail r.shail@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.
 
​The original cfp is below for your information.
 

This edited collection aims to re-examine horror in an era of remakes, reboots and re-imaginings. There have been many developments in the horror genre and whilst much of it has been reliant on previous material, there are also many shifts and changes such as

* cross-over of genres (for example, teen romance paired with vampires and werewolves, or horror in space);

* new formats such as Netflix, and cinema no longer being the only place we see horror;

* a resurgence of stories of hauntings and ghosts;

* and the popularity of ‘found footage’.

We wish to focus specifically on horror from 1995 to the present, as after a brief hiatus in the mainstream, the 1990s saw the return of horror to our screens - including our TV screens with, for example, /Buffy The Vampire Slayer /- and with horror and its characters more knowing than before.

We are happy for you to compare older material with newer versions, such as the recent Netflix version of /The Exorcist /(2016) with the original film/The Exorcist /(1973). The main requirement is that you interrogate whether the portrayal of gender has changed in horror – it may look like something different (more positive?) is happening, but is it?

We hope to encourage diverse perspectives and we welcome early career researchers and new voices to offer a different light on classic material, in sole- or multi-authored chapters.

We’d also like to gently remind potential authors that ‘gender’ doesn’t only apply to women, it applies to men and masculinities, and it encompasses non-binary identities and experiences, as well as issues about 'race', ethnicities and class. ​

The schedule is as follows:

* You send your chapter title, 200 word abstract and brief bio by the end of May 2017.

* The finalised proposal will be sent to the publisher Emerald in early summer.

* Your final first draft chapter (approx 7000 words) should be sent to us by January 31st 2018 (reminder/s will be sent).

* We will return any comments/revisions by the end of March 2018,

* and ask that you send us the final revised chapter by the end of June 2018.

* The completed manuscript will be submitted in July 2018 for publication in early 2019.

Please send your chapter titles, 200 word abstracts and a brief bio to the book editors by the end of May.

If you have any queries, or would like to contribute but need to tweak the schedule, please email us.

Editors:
Dr Samantha Holland s.holland@leedsbeckett.ac.uk
Dr Steven Gerrard S.D.Gerrard@leedsbeckett.ac.uk_
Prof Robert Shail R.Shail@leedsbeckett.ac.uk

If you are not familiar with the publisher, Emerald are an independent publisher, established by academics in 1967 and committed to retaining their independence.
And for your future reference: All hardback monograph publishing will be available in paperback after 24 months, and all books are available as ebooks. Emerald commission and cover the cost of indexing if authors don't want to do it themselves; use professional designers for each individual book jacket; and aim to exceed the royalties of other publishers. They have international offices, but pride themselves on not being a 'corporate machine'.